Home 7G Journalism Nanotechnology the Future of AI “a Horse of a Different Color” or “a Horse of That Color”?

Nanotechnology the Future of AI “a Horse of a Different Color” or “a Horse of That Color”?

by AIJ Varit
Dubai | Artificial Intelligence Journalism

Once again, media fosters a game-changer invention, that will transform the mode of all living forms forever.

Abass Alzanjne

|Abass Alzanjne|
Media and Mass Communication Researcher at Virginia Tech, USA
Head of International Relations (AIJRF)

Blacksburg, VA.  In 2019, simulation from the fantasy of a Marvel Cinematic Universe; a superhero, using “nanotechnology”[1], for the first time, to defeat the villain, who wiped out half of humanity, the real hero here was this Artificial Intelligence (AI) invention, which without, the hero wouldn’t be able to overcome the forces of evil.

For those who do not know, 2019 was not the first time when nanotechnology emerge into the world, in fact, many years before the term “nanotechnology” was coined.

On December 29, 1959, when the Nobel Prize Laureate in Physics 1965, Richard Feynman at an American Physical Society meeting at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech); present the concepts in his lecture titled, “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom.[2]

Feynman forecasted nanotechnology, he argued in the future people would control individual atoms and molecules. Feynman believed that step by step, scientists will try to reduce materials until we reach the nanoscale or control atoms, molecules described a process in which scientists would be able to manipulate and control individual atoms and molecules.


“OmniVision Technologies, a leading developer of advanced digital imaging solutions, has announced that its OV6948 product is the winner of the Guinness World Record for “Smallest Image Sensor Commercially Available” with a size of 0.575 mm x 0.575 mm,” Image by Future Timeline, 27th October 2019, https://www.futuretimeline.net/blog/2019/10/27-2.htm.

Nanotechnology as a concept.

In 2013, the National Geographic Society defined the concept as;” Nanotechnology involves the understanding and control of matter at the nanometer-scale. The so-called nanoscale deals with dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers.”[3]

Long before Freeman’s time, according to Hulla, JE, et al, the “nanoparticles”[4] significantly increased during the industrial revolution.  When another Nobel Prize Laureate in chemistry in 1925, Richard Zsigmondy, first introduce the concept of a “nanometer”[5]. Zsigmondy coined the term “nanometer” explicitly for characterizing particle size and he was the first to measure the size of particles such as gold colloids using a microscope.[6]

According to new research,” A nanometer is an extremely small unit of length—a billionth (10-9) of a meter. Just how small is a nanometer (nm)? A single human hair is about 80,000 to 100,000 nm wide.”[7]

A comparison of sizes of nanomaterial. Reproduced with permission from Gnach A., Lipinski T., Bednarkiewicz A., Rybka J., Capobianco J.A.

Nanotechnology: a necessity for all life forms.

With all these breakthroughs and much more, in a rapidly evolving world, where patience is wearing thin; “nanotechnology” become a necessity for all forms of life.

Many fields, including aerospace, media, information technology, homeland security, medicine, transportation, energy, food safety, and environmental science, have already adopted this technology.[8]

“Many products that have been made through nanotechnology are already on sale. They include sunscreen creams that contain nano-scale zinc oxide or titanium oxide, whose tiny size makes the sunscreen less visible when people apply it on their skin. Other nano-products that already exist include self-cleaning glass, water-resistant clothing, and scratch-proof materials. Nanotechnology is also used in foods, packaging, and pesticides, among other things.”[9]

Nanotechnology and Media

Nonetheless, “nanotechnology” biggest impact will be on media, in return, people and all other fields will be impacted.

Because journalism or media, in all its forms, has a great impact on public perception, more than other fields. No doubt, the media or journalism are the gateways to promoting everything new.

The media raises cognizance of specific topics, enlightens about existing disputes, involving a diverse range of actors who need to be heard, and thus serves as a foundation for future social debates.

Indeed, the lion’s share, from this technology, will go to the media. Every device or piece involved in building any type of equipment, used in journalism, will turn into tiny products.

Mohamed Abdulzaher, Ph.D. Academic and Pioneer of Artificial Intelligence Journalism, who coined the concept of  “7G Journalism”[10], which is adapted with the Fifth Industrial Revolution, argue that,”  the rapid development in nanotechnology will accelerate a major revolution in the human microchip and the media industries, and to upgrade  media technologies and solutions beyond Artificial Intelligence Journalism, and the great changes in light of the Fifth Industrial Revolution and the early emergence of 7G Journalism.”

Important changes

For instance, the traditional transmission devices (SNG) for broadcasting news, have been dispensed, with a small box that can be held by a hand or back, like LiveU.

The size of the camera, audio, and lighting devices are smaller than ever. There will be no longer a need for a hard drive on the camera, all recording materials can be directly transferred to the cloud storage.

Recently, the smallest sensor, used in the videography process has been produced already, according to Future Timeline,” OmniVision Technologies, a leading developer of advanced digital imaging solutions, has announced that its OV6948 product is the winner of the Guinness World Record for “Smallest Image Sensor Commercially Available” with a size of 0.575 mm x 0.575 mm.”[11]

Moreover, there is no longer a need to use hot yellow lighting with the presence of LEDs. As for audio devices, like mics, they have become just a small transmitter, depending on the miniaturization of the sensors involved in their manufacture.

Nanotechnology will reduce even a traditional news studio, with its equipment and technicians, to just one person who can do everything himself. According to Clauser, “ Nanocrystal or quantum dot technology is a new TV technology that uses nanoscopically small crystals (5 to 20 nanometers in size) as both a light and color source. In most TV applications, nanocrystals of various sizes are spread across a thin film in the LCD panel.”[12]

According to Abdulzaher;” AI technologies that the will replace all current media tools by images and automatic content broadcast from central stations, multiple satellites, which operate via smart electromagnetic waves, that are captured by the public through human microchips installed, and through the Internet of bodies, which will be the best way of communication at that time.”

For what it’s worth, it’s “a horse of a different color”. Unlike other technologies, it will interfere with all technologies and will be the nerve or materials that will be used in the construction of any future project. That will serve any types of life forms on Earth or other planets.


[1] What Is Nanotechnology? | National Nanotechnology Initiative. (n.d.-a). National Nanotechnology Initiative. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.nano.gov/nanotech-101/what/definition

[2] Feynman, Richard P. (1960) There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom. Engineering and Science, 23 (5). pp. 22-36. ISSN 0013-7812 https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechES:23.5.1960Bottom

[3] National Geographic Society. (2013, August 20). nanotechnology. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/nanotechnology/

[4] Hulla, JE, SC Sahu, and AW Hayes. “Nanotechnology: History and Future.” Human & Experimental Toxicology 34, no. 12 (December 2015): 1318–21. https://doi.org/10.1177/0960327115603588.    

[5] Hulla, JE, SC Sahu, and AW Hayes. “Nanotechnology: History and Future.” Human & Experimental Toxicology 34, no. 12 (December 2015): 1318–21. https://doi.org/10.1177/0960327115603588.    

[6] Hulla, JE, SC Sahu, and AW Hayes. “Nanotechnology: History and Future.” Human & Experimental Toxicology 34, no. 12 (December 2015): 1318–21. https://doi.org/10.1177/0960327115603588.    

[7] National Geographic Society. (2013, August 20). nanotechnology. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/nanotechnology/

[8] Benefits and Applications | National Nanotechnology Initiative. (n.d.). National Nanotechnology Initiative. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.nano.gov/you/nanotechnology-benefits

[9] Nanotechnology. (2011, January 6). Earth Journalism Network. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://earthjournalism.net/resources/nanotechnology

[10] Abdulzaher, M. (2020, October 12). A deeper insight into 7G journalism and the future beyond artificial intelligence technologies. GulfToday. Retrieved October 30, 2021, from https://www.gulftoday.ae/opinion/2020/10/12/a-deeper-insight-into-7g-journalism

[11] Fox, W. (2019a, October 19). World’s smallest image sensor is just half a millimetre wide. Future Timeline. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.futuretimeline.net/blog/2019/10/27-2.htm

[12] Clauser, G. (2016, June 2). Understanding New TV Tech: OLED TV, Nano Crystal Technology, Quantum Dot and What It All Means. Electronic House. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.electronichouse.com/smart-tv/understanding-new-tv-tech-oled-tv-nano-crystals-quantum-dot-means/


References

Reference

What Is Nanotechnology? | National Nanotechnology Initiative. (n.d.-a). National Nanotechnology Initiative. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.nano.gov/nanotech-101/what/definition 

National Geographic Society. (2013, August 20). nanotechnology. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/nanotechnology/

Feynman, Richard P. (1960) There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom. Engineering and Science, 23 (5). pp. 22-36. ISSN 0013-7812 https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechES:23.5.1960Bottom

Hulla, JE, SC Sahu, and AW Hayes. “Nanotechnology: History and Future.” Human & Experimental Toxicology 34, no. 12 (December 2015): 1318–21. https://doi.org/10.1177/0960327115603588.  

Fox, W. (2019a, October 19). World’s smallest image sensor is just half a millimetre wide. Future Timeline. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.futuretimeline.net/blog/2019/10/27-2.htm

Clauser, G. (2016, June 2). Understanding New TV Tech: OLED TV, Nano Crystal Technology, Quantum Dot and What It All Means. Electronic House. Retrieved October 27, 2021, from https://www.electronichouse.com/smart-tv/understanding-new-tv-tech-oled-tv-nano-crystals-quantum-dot-means/

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